#2TERMZ

President Barack Obama and Vice President Jose...

25 reasons from 25 people who are voting Obama:

1. “The Affordable Care Act is saving my daughter’s life.”
Stacey, Arizona

2. “Obama is for the vets. He helped us wind down in Iraq, he’s improved mental health policy with VA benefits.”
Joel, Minnesota

3. “Obama stuck his neck out for us, the auto industry. He wasn’t going to let it just die, and I’m driving in this morning because of that, because of him.”
Brian, Ohio

4. “Osama bin Laden is dead, and General Motors is alive.”
Joe Biden, Delaware

5. “Supreme Court Supreme Court Supreme Court.”
Andrew, California

6. “Arithmetic.”
Bill Clinton, New York

7. “He cares for the 100 percent.”
Shana, Texas

8. “When Obama came into office, he successfully renewed our country’s place in the community of nations, making cooperation in tackling the world’s challenges possible.”
Willis, North Carolina

9. “The actions he has taken with respect to protecting us from terrorism have been very, very solid.”
Colin Powell, Virginia

10. “I was really very grateful to him for standing up for those kids who are having a really rough time out there because of their orientation.”
Jane Lynch, California

11. “For me, President Obama is our best choice because he has a vision of the United States as a place where we are all in this together.”
Bruce Springsteen, New Jersey

12. “He has a real plan for rescuing the economy that passes the ‘math’ test.”
Teresa, Virginia

13. “Having someone in office who understands how powerful our voice can be is very important.”
Jay Z, New York

14. “I am voting for Barack Obama and Joe Biden because I can trust them to care for the middle class and restore the American dream.”
Steven, Florida

15. “The first measure he signed into law after becoming president was the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act — so a female high school counselor or physical education teacher can fight for equal pay for equal work.”
Connie Britton, California

16. “I believe in the America he wants for my grandchildren.”
Nancy, Michigan

17. “We need four more years of repair, of helping the middle class achieve a sustainable economy.”
James Taylor, North Carolina

18. “I’ve watched him fight for our country, stand by the middle class, the working class, the military, the education of our children, universal health care, women, the environment, and matters of national and domestic security.”
Susan, Virginia

19. “The gifted 12-year-old I taught, whose parents were deported and left her here with her grandmother, will be allowed to stay and finish her education. She’s been in the U.S. since age one.”
Jamie, North Carolina

20. “I want our president to place scientific evidence and risk management above electoral politics.”
Michael Bloomberg, New York

21. “I have four children who are under 26 and able to stay on my health care plan. That’s been huge.”
Amy, Pennsylvania

22. “He’s fighting to defend and better Social Security and Medicare — because millions of Latino seniors rely on them.”
Cristina Saralegui, Florida

23. “Thanks to the President’s efforts to keep student loan rates low, I can expect to save nearly $1000 as I work to repay my student loans. And I don’t have too many of those, thanks to the Federal Pell Grant program.”
Sam, Minnesota

24. “It’s been wonderful to have President Obama as a champion for access to health care for all women in this country.”
Cecile Richards, New York

25. “Re-electing Barack Obama would lead to a stronger economic recovery than would be the case were Mitt Romney to win on November 6th.”
Jared Bernstein, Washington, D.C.

PLEASE VOTE!

(One of the millions of emails I received from the ObamaBiden 2012 campaign)

Blogging: The First Two Years

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At a recent vacation, blogging between rest and relaxation.

Two years ago today, on Independence Day, I wrote my first post for this blog. Against the firework-lit Manhattan sky, Cubiyanqui came to be.

This blog has been, and continues to be, a challenge, satisfying work and a great source of joy and pride. Also a perfect channel “to share my creative efforts and other obsessions with my friends and the rest of the world.”

In this time I’ve posted 781 times on 109 different categories with 1,281 tags. Through today, the site has had a total of 23,335 visitors from as far away as Viet Nam and South Africa.

Of the many comments those visitors have left, one hateful diatribe stands out  — and I mean hateful — written in response to a political article I posted. Someone didn’t agree with a constitutionally-protected progressive point of view I expressed. The comment, the only one of it’s kind I ever got, was full of racist, xenophobic words, also wishing me a painful death from a certain disease. I deleted it. Sent it to the trash, where that stuff belongs.

The comment that stands in stark contrast to that one was posted in response to an essay I wrote about missing my Dad on his birthday. It was from someone who was missing their own Dad and was searching the internet for a little relief from the ache. It was a brief human connection, the kind possible between reader and writer, born out of a common loss and the shared blessing of having known someone exceptional. That comment is the one I treasure today, on this second anniversary.

Thanks for you support over the last 2 years. I look forward to your next visit.

Worth Repeating

Let’s say what is plainly true (and what the President himself is reluctant to say): these rumors, this industry of fantasy, are designed to arouse a fear of the Other, of an African-American man with a white American mother and a black Kenyan father. Obama, as a politician, is clearly not a radical; he is a center-left pragmatist. If anything, he believes deeply in his capacity to lead with subtle diplomacy and political maneuvering, with a highly realistic sense of the possible; in fact, to many he is maddeningly pragmatic.

The one radical thing about Barack Obama is his race, his name. Of course, there is nothing innately radical about being black or having Hussein as middle name; what is radical is that he has those attributes and is sitting in the Oval Office. And even now, more than two years after the fact, this is deeply disturbing to many people, and, at the same time, the easiest way to arouse visceral opposition to him. Let’s be even plainer: to do what Trump has done (and he is only the latest and loudest and most spectacularly hirsute) is a conscious form of race-baiting, of fear-mongering. And if that makes Donald Trump proud, then what does that say for him?

David Remnick, in a post at The New Yorker, 4/27/11