Cocoa Krispies Inmunity Boost

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and other aggressive marketing claims from Kellogg:

Kellogg, the nation’s largest cereal maker, is being called to task by critics who object to the swine flu-conscious claim now bannered in bold lettering on the front of Cocoa Krispies cereal boxes: “Now helps support your child’s IMMUNITY.”

Of all claims on cereal boxes, “this one belongs in the hall of fame,” says Kelly Brownell, director of Yale University’s Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity. “By their logic, you can spray vitamins on a pile of leaves, and it will boost immunity.”

More from USA Today here

Cocoa Krispies
Product Image by Kellogg

And if you want to know what’s in Cocoa Krispies, here’s the ingredient list from  Kellogg:

RICE, SUGAR, COCOA PROCESSED WITH ALKALI, SEMISWEET CHOCOLATE (SUGAR, CHOCOLATE, ANHYDROUS DEXTROSE), PARTIALLY HYDROGENATED VEGETABLE OIL (ONE OR MORE OF: COCONUT, SOYBEAN AND/OR COTTONSEED)?, SALT, MALT FLAVORING, CALCIUM CARBONATE, HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP, ARTIFICIAL FLAVOR, ASCORBIC ACID AND SODIUM ASCORBATE (VITAMIN C), IRON, ALPHA TOCOPHEROL ACETATE (VITAMIN E), NIACINAMIDE, ZINC OXIDE, VITAMIN A PALMITATE, PYRIDOXINE HYDROCHLORIDE (VITAMIN B6), RIBOFLAVIN (VITAMIN B2), THIAMIN HYDROCHLORIDE (VITAMIN B1), FOLIC ACID, BHT (PRESERVATIVE), VITAMIN D, VITAMIN B12.

I don’t recognize a third of these words but they sound like code scientific curse words.

What Can Brown Do For You?

(Especially Dark Brown!)

Professor Stefan Bernhard, assistant professor of chemistry at Princeton University, suggests that we should: “Eat more chocolate, especially dark chocolate.” This was at a recent meeting of the Experimental Cuisine Collective, as reported by by Joseph Erdos at Gastronomer’s Guide.

That exortation came at the end of what appears to be a lengthy technical discussion of the historical origins and the chemical components of chocolate. Items like:

…chocolate, known by its scientific name as theobroma cacao, a fruit, which comes in three varieties: criollo, which is very rare; forastero, a hardier type; and trinitario, which is a hybrid of the previous two, commonly grown in the Caribbean.

and

Flavor depends on origin, drying, and roasting. There are many opinions regarding the best tasting chocolate. Americans tend to like Hershey’s over any other type, whereas Europeans prefer European chocolate from Switzerland or Belgium. There are more than fifty chocolate flavor molecules.

On certain days, I can taste at least forty seven of those molecules.