How To Copyright Your Work

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One of the things to do after you finish your opus. The other thing to do is to begin Opus #2. From The Library of Congress, U.S. Copyright Office:

“Copyright is a form of protection provided by the laws of the United States
(title 17, U. S. Code) to the authors of “original works of authorship,” including
literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This
protection is available to both published and unpublished works. Section 106
of the 1976 Copyright Act generally gives the owner of copyright the exclusive
right to do and to authorize others to do the following:
• reproduce the work in copies or phonorecords.
• prepare derivative works based upon the work.
• distribute copies or phonorecords of the work to the public by sale or other
transfer of ownership, or by rental, lease, or lending.
• perform the work publicly, in the case of literary, musical, dramatic, and
choreographic works, pantomimes, and motion pictures and other audiovisual
works.
• display the work publicly, in the case of literary, musical, dramatic, and choreographic works, pantomimes, and pictorial, graphic, or sculptural works, including the individual images of a motion picture or other audiovisual work.
• perform the work publicly (in the case of sound recordings*) by means of a digital audio transmission.”

There’s more info here.

Still More on E-Book Rights

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This appears to be a hot topic. This entry from David Pogue:

Last week, Barnes & Noble’s Nook e-book reader took on Amazon’s Kindle, joining the Sony Reader and several smaller players. And that arena has only just begun to heat up; in the next few months, a raft of additional models will appear.

One of my readers is alarmed by a precedent being set:

“When the iPod introduced music lovers to the idea of copy protection, a years-long war ensued between consumers and the RIAA (and others). The primary issue was that if I purchased a song for my music player, it would only play on that player; I didn’t really own it, per se. Years later, we finally have digital music without copy protection.

There’s more…