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A question I’m often asked. But, if this research bears fruit, that will never be a problem again.

From the NY Times’ Digital Domain:

IMAGINE sitting down at your work keyboard, typing in your user name and starting work right away — no password needed.

That’s a vision that the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, part of the Defense Department, wants to turn into a reality. It will distribute research funds to develop software that determines, just by the way you type, that you are indeed the person you say you are.

More HERE.

Google’s New Privacy Policy Is Coming… Quick, Hide Your Stuff!!!

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A warning from Digital Journal about the new Privacy Policy slated to take effect on March 1st, 2012, from non-evil doer Google:

With just a week to go before Google changes to its new privacy policy that allows it to gather, store and use personal information, users have a last chance to delete their Google Browsing History, along with any damning information therein.

I am sure am not alone in my love/hate relationship with the Google. This latest policy creepy update by them is getting a lot of deserved attention. More from the Digital Journal article:

Tech News Daily reports that once Google’s new unified privacy policy takes effect all data already collected about you, including search queries, sites visited, age, gender and location will be gathered and assigned to your online identity represented by your Gmail and YouTube accounts. After the policy takes effect you are not allowed to opt out without abandoning Google altogether.

The 6 easy steps to taking control of your info are HERE.

Plus:

Compromised Email?

Check to see if your Email was one of the nearly 40,000 addresses recently breached. Even if it wasn’t,  changing your password frequently is strongly suggested by all security experts.

Here’s the link at ServerSniff.net. This link was provided by CounterMeasures’ Rik Ferguson.

The BBC has the details:

BBC News has seen two lists that detail more than 30,000 names and passwords from e-mail providers, including Yahoo and AOL, which were posted online.

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