Another Self-Publishing Success Story

From the Andrew Sullivan’s The Dish, a story that makes people like me salivate:

I spent years shopping my novel to publishers and agents; after reaching the end of my patience I dumped the book into the Kindle Bookstore expecting only my mother to buy it.

I did no marketing. Somehow (I’m still not quite sure how) the word spread.

There’s more. . .

Is E-Reading Here to Stay?

From The Associated Press, via The New York Times:

The marriage of an American technology firm and a Taiwanese display panel manufacturer has helped make digital reading a prospective challenger to paper as the main medium for transmitting printed information.Four years ago Cambridge, Mass.-based E Ink Corporation and Taiwan’s Prime View International Co. hooked up to create an e-paper display that now supplies 90 percent of the fast growing e-reader market.

The Taiwanese involvement has led some observers to compare e-reading to the Chinese technological revolution 2,000 years ago in which newly invented paper replaced the bulky wooden blocks and bamboo slats on which Chinese characters were written.

There’s more…

Amazon: E-Books Sales Surpass Hardcover

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In this corner, The New York Times:

The heft and musty smell of a hardcover book are one step closer to becoming relics in a museum.

Amazon.com, one of the nation’s largest bookstores, said Monday that for the last three months, sales of electronic books for the Kindle, Amazon’s e-reader, outnumbered sales of hardcover books for the first time.

and in the other corner, Digital Book World:

Depending on where you get your news, and how far beyond the tweets and catchy headlines you tend to read, yesterday’s well-timed press release from Amazon (they release their 2Q report on Thursday) either came as a shocker (TIPPING POINT!) or an interesting soft data point in need of further clarification.

We shall get to the bottom of this…

Books as Treasures Waiting to be Discovered

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The experience of Cecilia Tan, Founder/Publisher, Circlet Press via Digital Book World:

I gave a talk as part of a panel in the Bookbuilders of Boston / Emerson College “Gutenberg to Google” series of presentations on the ebook r/evolution. I promised I’d put it online later for those who missed it, and here it is — my take on “discoverability” and how this key principle is behind three of the hot button issues facing publishers going digital, namely:

1) the transition from physical retail marketplace to the online marketplace
2) the importance of social media and author involvement
3) Piracy! Yarrr!

I didn’t get into ebooks and place myself on the cutting edge of new book technology because I thought ebooks were really cool and I wanted to be where the action was. No, I was essentially FORCED to become an expert on ebooks or my company was dead in the water. I founded Circlet Press in 1992, way back before a little thing we refer to now as “The Returns Crisis.”

There’s more…

On E-Book Price Fight, Advantage Publishers

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Via NY Times, the latest play by play:

Could book publishers suddenly be in the position of telling Google what to do?

With the impending arrival of digital books on the Apple iPad and feverish negotiations with Amazon.com over e-book prices, publishers have managed to take some control — at least temporarily — of how much consumers pay for their content.

Now, as publishers enter discussions with the Web giant Google about its plan to sell digital versions of new books direct to consumers, they have a little more leverage than just a few weeks ago — at least when it comes to determining how Google will pay publishers for those e-books and how much consumers will pay for them.

There’s more…

Still More on E-Book Rights

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This appears to be a hot topic. This entry from David Pogue:

Last week, Barnes & Noble’s Nook e-book reader took on Amazon’s Kindle, joining the Sony Reader and several smaller players. And that arena has only just begun to heat up; in the next few months, a raft of additional models will appear.

One of my readers is alarmed by a precedent being set:

“When the iPod introduced music lovers to the idea of copy protection, a years-long war ensued between consumers and the RIAA (and others). The primary issue was that if I purchased a song for my music player, it would only play on that player; I didn’t really own it, per se. Years later, we finally have digital music without copy protection.

There’s more…